NASA Math and Space Pioneer Katherine Johnson Dies At 101

Katherine Johnson, often called the “human computer” by her fellow NASA mathematicians, passed away this week at the age of 101. Her work went largely unnoticed for most of her life until the Oscar-nominated 2016 movie “Hidden Figures” that told the stories of Johnson and two other black women who worked at NASA.

This Week in Space! – February 24, 1997 – Fire Onboard the Mir Space Station

Twenty-three years ago, six crew members on the Russian Space Station Mir faced significant danger when fire broke out in the solid fuel oxygen generator.

This Week in Space – February 17, 1965 – NASA Launches Ranger 8 Lunar Probe

This week in 1965, NASA launched Ranger 8, part of the series of nine Ranger spacecraft launched in the early 1960s to explore the moon.

AMU Reaches for the Stars with Space Summit

The inaugural Space Education and Strategic Applications (SESA) Conference, sponsored by American Military University, will be held at the historic Quaker Meetinghouse, 2111 Florida Ave., NW, Washington, D.C., on Friday, April 17, 2020.

NASA Math and Space Pioneer Katherine Johnson Dies At 101

This Week in Space! – February 24, 1997 – Fire Onboard the Mir Space Station

This Week in Space – February 17, 1965 – NASA Launches Ranger 8 Lunar Probe

AMU Reaches for the Stars with Space Summit

Katherine Johnson, often called the “human computer” by her fellow NASA mathematicians, passed away this week at the age of 101. Her work went largely unnoticed for most of her life until the Oscar-nominated 2016 movie “Hidden Figures” that told the stories of Johnson and two other black women who worked at NASA.
In the first article in this series, I discussed the Drake Equation and its suggestion that intelligent life could exist elsewhere the Milky Way galaxy. In the second article, I examined the Fermi Paradox, which implies that the lack of extraterrestrial contact at this point in the galaxy’s evolution cannot be reconciled with what we should expect to see according to Drake.
In the first part of this article series, I discussed the Drake Equation and its suggestion that the galaxy might be teeming with intelligent life. However, a major contradiction to the fundamental implications of the Drake Equation comes in the form of the Fermi Paradox, a logical quandary first observed by physicist Enrico Fermi in the early twentieth century.