This Week in Space History – March 31, 2005 Cassini, Titan Flyby

On Thursday, March 31, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft successfully flew by Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, at about 2,400 kilometers (1,500 miles) above the surface.

This Week in Space – Werner Von Braun Born

This week in 1912, one of history’s most controversial figures, Werner Von Braun, was born into minor nobility in the small town of Wirsitz in Posen province, then part of the German Empire.

This Week in Space – March 16, 1975 – Mariner 10 Probe Bids Farewell to Mercury

After a brief visit to Venus, Mariner 10 performed three flybys of Mercury; the final flyby occurring this week in 1975.

The Brilliance of Sir Isaac Newton and His Legacy to Us

Few truly appreciate the contributions that Newton made to our understanding of the cosmos, and the trajectory of progress for our species.

This Week in Space History – March 31, 2005 Cassini, Titan Flyby

This Week in Space – Werner Von Braun Born

This Week in Space – March 16, 1975 – Mariner 10 Probe Bids Farewell to Mercury

The Brilliance of Sir Isaac Newton and His Legacy to Us

The NASA Spirit and Opportunity rovers landed on Mars in 2004. They used a unique entry, descent, and landing (EDL) sequence that allowed for safe landing on the red planet. First, the rovers were encapsulated by heat shields that protected them from the heat of aerodynamic drag in the initial entry into the Martian atmosphere.
The India Space Research Organization (ISRO) is a fledgling national space agency compared with its older counterparts in the United States, Russia, and Europe. However, it is quickly making a name for itself in space research and has set an ambitious agenda for future space exploration missions. One key target for such research is Mars.
The inaugural Space Education and Strategic Applications (SESA) Conference, sponsored by American Military University, will be held at the historic Quaker Meetinghouse, 2111 Florida Ave., NW, Washington, D.C., on Friday, April 17, 2020.
Katherine Johnson, often called the “human computer” by her fellow NASA mathematicians, passed away this week at the age of 101. Her work went largely unnoticed for most of her life until the Oscar-nominated 2016 movie “Hidden Figures” that told the stories of Johnson and two other black women who worked at NASA.